Coat Colour introduction

Cats display a wide variety of coat colours and patterns. Classification of these colours can be confusing sometimes because different registries or associations may use different names for the same colour. Several genes determine the coat colour of a cat. Unfortunately not for all genes involved the genetic background is...

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B-Locus (Cinnamon and Chocolate)

The coat colours black, chocolate/brown and cinnamon/red are controlled by the gene TYRP1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) which is involved in the production of the black colour pigment eumelanin. This gene locus is also called the B-locus. The Coat Colour Cinnamon (K755) and Coat Colour Chocolate (K756) combined reveal the genetic...

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D-Locus (Dilution)

The dilute gene (MLPH gene) is responsible for the intensity of the coat colour by affecting the amount of pigments in the hair shaft. This gene is also known as the D-locus and dilutes all colours. The Coat Colour Dilution test (K760) tests for the genetic status of the D-locus....

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C-Locus (Siamese and Burmese)

The Siamese and Burmese coat patterns are controlled by the gene TYR (tyrosinase) which produces an enzyme that is required for melanin production. The Burmese pattern is a result from reduced pigment production changing black pigment to sepia and orange to yellow. The Burmese points are darker than the body...

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E-Locus (Extension)

The Extension gene (MCR1 gene) controls the production of black and red pigment. In cats, shades of red color are determined by the dominant Orange gene (O-locus) located on the X chromosome. The genetic background of the O-Locus is still unknown. The Extension gene is also known as E-locus. The...

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W-Locus / S-Locus (Dominant White and White Spotting)

Dominant White and White Spotting are controlled by the KIT-gene. Dominant white is also described as the W-locus and White Spotting as the S-locus. The gene/genes controlling the pattern of White Spotting is still unknown. Additionally, not all white spots or patterns result from the KIT-gene as other genes can...

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