I-Locus

The MFSD12 gene, also known as I-Locus affects the expression of the pheomelanin (red) pigment. The MFSD12 gene has no effect on eumelanin (black) pigment, therefore the black coat and the black hair ends remain black. The mutation affects the pheomelanin in the entire coat resulting in a pure white...

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A-Locus

The Agouti gene (ASIP gene) is responsible for the production of a protein that regulates the distribution of black pigment (eumelanin) within the hair shaft. This gene is also known as the A-locus and determines whether an animal expresses an agouti appearance, and if so what type, by controlling the...

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K-Locus

The Beta-defensin gene (CBD103 gene) produces dominant black vs. brindle vs. fawn coat colours. This gene is also known as the K-locus or Dominant black gene. The coat colour is further complicated by the interaction with the E-locus and the A-locus (agouti). The Coat Colour K-Locus (H819) tests for the genetic...

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M-Locus (Merle)

The Silver gene (SILV gene), also called premelanosome protein (PMEL17 gene) is responsible for Merle. This gene is also known as M-Locus. Merle only dilutes eumelanin (black) pigment; dogs with two copies of the allele e (homozygous e/e) at E-Locus have no black pigment, thus do not express merle. Merle...

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Saddle tan vs black-and-tan

The hnRNP associated with lethal yellow gene (RALY gene) defines whether tan points or saddle tan is expressed in Basset Hounds and Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs. Black and tan colour is characterized by light colour on the muzzle, above the eyes (tan points) and on the undersides of the dog...

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Panda White Spotting

A mutation in the KIT-gene is associated with a white spotting pattern in German Shepherd Dogs, this pattern is  also called Panda White Spotting. The mutation is very recent, it appeared spontaneously in a female born in 2000. The gene for white-spotting is known as the S-locus (MITF-Gene), however this...

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H-Locus (Harlequin)

The 20S proteasome β2 subunit (PSMB7) gene is responsible for the Harlequin coat pattern in Great Danes. This gene is also known as H-Locus. Harlequin is a pattern resulting from interaction of the Merle (M-locus) gene and the Harlequin (H-locus) gene on black pigment. The Harlequin gene can modify the Merle...

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Coat Colour introduction

Dogs display a wide variety of coat colours and patterns. Classification of these colours can be confusing sometimes because different registries or associations may use different names for the same colour. In each dog two pigments are the basis for their coat colour: black pigment (eumelanin) and red/yellow/cream pigment (pheomelanin)....

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S-Locus (Piebald)

The white spotting patterns that occur in many dog breeds do not have a uniform genetic basis. The Microphthalmia Associated Transcription Factor gene (MITF gene) is associated with many white spotting patterns. This gene is also known as the S-Locus. There are three major white spotting patterns described. One pattern...

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E-Locus / Em-locus

In each dog two pigments are the basis for their coat colour: black pigment (eumelanin) and red/yellow/cream pigment (pheomelanin). The production of black and red/yellow/cream pigment is controlled by the Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) gene, also known as Extension gene or E-Locus. The Coat Colour E-Locus (H734) and Coat Colour...

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Co-Locus (Cocoa)

The Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 3 (HPS3) gene, also known as cocoa coat colour or co-locus is responsible for the brown colour in French Bulldogs. Mutations of the HPS3 gene interfere with the eumalin (black pigment) synthesis, which results in brown-pigmentation. The brown colour caused by the HPS3-variants is known to darken...

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B-locus

The Tyrosinase-Related Protein 1 (TYRP1) gene, also known as Brown gene or B-Locus controls the dilution from black pigment to brown. The TYRP1 gene has no effect on the hair colour of dogs that are homozygous ee for the E-Locus as they do not have black pigment, but does have...

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D-Locus / D-Locus Improved

The dilute gene (MLPH gene) is responsible for the intensity of the coat colour by affecting the distribution of melanin-containing cells. This gene is also known as the D-Locus and dilutes all colours. Besides the hair colour also the colour of the nose is diluted and the colour of the...

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